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Our Community of Practitioners
Our Community of Practitioners
Our Community of Practitioners
We seek to improve the lives of children, young people and adults through direct service provision, respectful practice and neurobiologically informed research.
We seek to improve the lives of children, young people and adults through direct service provision, respectful practice and neurobiologically informed research.
We seek to improve the lives of children, young people and adults through direct service provision, respectful practice and neurobiologically informed research.
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Kimberly Geffray

Art Psychotherapist

Kim has a passion for art and for art making.  She describes discovering Art Psychotherapy as a young woman in her teens who was struggling to find a career that would combine her desire to help others with her passionate love of art.  Very early during her training Kim also discovered the power of art making and its relationship to healing.  As her career unfolded, Kim began to see the art making process as a profoundly powerful form of communication for children and young people who were struggling with various emotional and mental health difficulties.

Since commencing work in this field several years ago, Kim has worked across different NHS adult service settings, but in the last five years worked in child and adolescent mental health services.  In this role she worked closely with traumatised children and young people who have experienced a great deal of early life adversity, including multiple attachment disruptions and trauma.  She is keen to continue working closely with children with complex early attachment difficulties and developmental trauma.

Kim believes that parents and caregivers play a unique role in the healing process so often prefers to work together with children and their parents/carers.  She has found that this form of dyadic art therapy is particularly powerful in restoring more nurturing patterns of communication and strengthening fragile attachment bonds.

Kim is registered as an Art Psychotherapist with Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC).

Kimberly Geffray

Art Psychotherapist

Kim has a passion for art and for art making.  She describes discovering Art Psychotherapy as a young woman in her teens who was struggling to find a career that would combine her desire to help others with her passionate love of art.  Very early during her training Kim also discovered the power of art making and its relationship to healing.  As her career unfolded, Kim began to see the art making process as a profoundly powerful form of communication for children and young people who were struggling with various emotional and mental health difficulties.

Since commencing work in this field several years ago, Kim has worked across different NHS adult service settings, but in the last five years worked in child and adolescent mental health services.  In this role she worked closely with traumatised children and young people who have experienced a great deal of early life adversity, including multiple attachment disruptions and trauma.  She is keen to continue working closely with children with complex early attachment difficulties and developmental trauma.

Kim believes that parents and caregivers play a unique role in the healing process so often prefers to work together with children and their parents/carers.  She has found that this form of dyadic art therapy is particularly powerful in restoring more nurturing patterns of communication and strengthening fragile attachment bonds.

Kim is registered as an Art Psychotherapist with Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC).

Kimberly Geffray

Art Psychotherapist

Kim has a passion for art and for art making.  She describes discovering Art Psychotherapy as a young woman in her teens who was struggling to find a career that would combine her desire to help others with her passionate love of art.  Very early during her training Kim also discovered the power of art making and its relationship to healing.  As her career unfolded, Kim began to see the art making process as a profoundly powerful form of communication for children and young people who were struggling with various emotional and mental health difficulties.

Since commencing work in this field several years ago, Kim has worked across different NHS adult service settings, but in the last five years worked in child and adolescent mental health services.  In this role she worked closely with traumatised children and young people who have experienced a great deal of early life adversity, including multiple attachment disruptions and trauma.  She is keen to continue working closely with children with complex early attachment difficulties and developmental trauma.

Kim believes that parents and caregivers play a unique role in the healing process so often prefers to work together with children and their parents/carers.  She has found that this form of dyadic art therapy is particularly powerful in restoring more nurturing patterns of communication and strengthening fragile attachment bonds.

Kim is registered as an Art Psychotherapist with Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC).